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Fancy that!

December 13, 2017 Leave a comment

What with imitation being the sincerest form of flattery and plagiarism being legally dubious, we were delighted/ furious to see that the BBC’s graphics team have obviously started following our social posts for Moskovskaya.

Not massively dissimilar, we reckon. What do you think?

Moskovstakingpart

 

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Feeling social?

December 8, 2017 Leave a comment

Social media isn’t necessarily right for all brands. Certainly, as my old mate* the Ad Contrarian has loudly proclaimed, many of the claims made on behalf of Facebook and its fellow data thieves a few years ago have turned out to be rather empty.

It transpires that social is a little more like old media than many people once thought. Maybe that’s why it’s taken this long for Breakfast to produce its first (a brief dalliance with the Phone Co-Op aside) fully-formed social campaign, for our favourite vodka, Moskovskaya.

In partnership with hungry upstarts Studio Appetite, we have been producing some ads (there’s no more appropriate term) for two or three months now, and having some fun while doing so.

(You’ll need to follow the brand on Facebook, Instagram or twitter to see the animated bits, links and accompanying text. Sorry.)

Having avoided being too vocal on the merits or otherwise of social media for building brands, I have now progressed from interested observer into an advocate of treating these channels as opportunities. Thye offer brands without big budgets (or even medium-sized budgets) to reach a potentially massive audience with a relatively small spend.

We’re not mistaking our ‘likes’ for customers, or expecting our audience to become evangelists (the world has more than enough of those at the moment). But we are (we think) producing good work for a genuinely distinctive, strong vodka brand. It might take us a while to conquer the world, and we might not achieve domination via social alone.

But we’re in the game. And enjoying it.

*He’s not a mate: I’ve never met him. But I’m pretty sure we’d get on.

WTF?

November 13, 2017 2 comments

Making good advertising isn’t easy. The moment when you see the first cut from the editor and realise that the spot you’ve grafted on for three months is a dud, not a D&AD, is horrible. For that reason, I am loth to criticise ads for simply being, in my humble opinion, terrible. It can happen to anyone.

Some ads can be bad and still work: I’ve made a few of those. Others can be good and fail dismally to do their job, i.e. sell stuff. I’ve made a few of those too.

Fortunately for me (if not my clients), the clunkers were TV commercials – bad in a way that would have made them invisible rather than fist-bitingly awful – and endured by the audience in the comfort of their own homes. I never had to observe the public’s reaction.

That is not the case for this – a commercial that actually made me put my hands to my head in the cinema yesterday, while a fellow audience member uttered an audible “What the fuck?”.

Maybe it seemed like a good idea at the script stage. Maybe you’ll watch it and love it.

Then again, maybe not.

 

 

The waterfall economy

November 1, 2017 1 comment

I’ve always liked the idea of coining a phrase or saying that goes on to become commonplace, but never managed it. Damn Malcolm Gladwell and his appropriation of “tipping point” merely weeks after I had called the same phenomenon something not quite as catchy (I can’t remember what).

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Anyway, I have been thinking for ages about how best to describe the economy in the town in which I live. If you reside in south-east England’s commuter belt, I’m sure your high street looks much like mine: lots of estate agents, coffee shops, cafes, restaurants and mobile phone stores, interspersed with poundshops, charity shops and vacant premises.

It’s not pretty. On a busy Friday night, with the bars and restaurants full, it feels like a thriving, wealthy town. But by day, the town is divided: affluent mums, dads and their toddlers are queueing out of the door at Costa Coffee and Caffe Nero, while the down-at-heel retail establishments stand almost empty; the passing trade (and I am aware how this might sound) generally being either elderly, infirm, unemployed or a mixture of all three. It looks and feels like a deprived town somewhere more than 35 miles north of one of the richest cities in the world.

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None of this is news, I know. And the reasons for the decline of the high street have much to do with internet retailers as anything else. But it has seemed apparent for years now that in the south-east, our economy is massively reliant on the immense wealth of a very few high earners at the top of the income pile: the stockbrokers in our stockbroker belt and ‘hedgies’ in our country homes.

The ‘trickle-down’ theory of economics has, I think, been pretty discredited over the past 30 years. In short, it doesn’t work; certainly not in terms of enabling those not eating at the top table to see their living standards rise at the same pace of others. Inequality in the UK is growing quicker than anywhere else in the world. The haves and the have nots never used to be this easily distinguishable.

But in an economy built on service industries, ‘trickle down’ is what we have: a huge proportion of the local population in my town seems to me to be entirely reliant on the wealth of the very few.  Again, I acknowledge that this is the model we have built and, of course, one which most people subscribe to. But I believe that a more accurate description of our turbo-charged ‘trickle down’ economy is ‘waterfall’. A small percentage of people have a massive amount of disposable wealth and it is this torrent of money which is cascading on to the vast majority, waiting at the bottom of the cliff. There’s an awful lot of water – enough to enable most to stay afloat. There’s so much that it enables us to fund our public services too. But if the amount of water falling from the top decreases, there will be big trouble. And Brexit is the equivalent of building a huge dam upstream.

Now this isn’t an anti-Brexit diatribe: I am merely arguing that the inevitability of our economy shrinking as thousands of the very highest earners leave the City of London will have an obvious effect on those dependent on that wealth. My assertion is that there are more people dependent on this money than anyone realises and that the south east in particular is going to suffer a significant and potentially brutal period of readjustment.

This readjustment – away from such an unbalanced, top-heavy economy – might well be necessary. However, I’m pretty sure that’s not what people were voting for when they decided to leave the EU, and I’m equally sure that the fallout – socially, politically and culturally – will be unpleasant.

We’ve built a world that relies on exponential growth and the creation of shareholder value; a world that can only work if it encourages ever more people to spend ever more money and generate ever more ‘wealth’. I think that ‘Waterfall Economy’ sums it up pretty well – not well enough to become a common phrase, but it’s the best I can do.

Over to you, Malcolm.

 

Does good writing matter anymore?

October 11, 2017 Leave a comment

I may have mentioned before that I am nothing if not a pedant when it comes to writing, particularly with regards to spelling and punctuation (we’ll come back to ‘Regards’ later). As an example of this pedantry, I find myself momentarily unable to look at my Barclays Bank online banking gizmo when logging in, because some doofus added a question mark after the instruction PRESS ENTER. I genuinely cannot see this without getting angry. (If there’s anyone else out there who shares this affliction, get in touch and we can set up a support group.)

Anyway, there have been a couple of instances over the last week or so when my linguistic anal-retentiveness has been triggered.

First, ‘warmest condolences’. I know Donald Trump is a “fucking moron” but really? It’s almost as if he’s actually a Russian chatbot with no empathy and a sketchy grasp of English.

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Second, I saw an article debating the correct way to sign off a business email and shuddered in recognition. Despite being, it says on my CV, a writer, I find formal writing quite difficult (although even I am aware that ‘Sincerest condolences’ or ‘Deepest condolences’ would be more appropriate than ‘Warmest’). Knowing which salutation or sign off to use still makes me more hesitant than almost anything else I write, and is especially tricky because I am aware how I respond when I see ‘Best’ at the bottom of an email. If it was followed by Law, Charlton I might forgive the writer.

Anyway, the article suggested ‘Thanks’ as an appropriate sign off, as it’s genuine, friendly and informal. Personally, I’m not so sure. But I understood the apprehension that can accompany the wrong language in a business setting.

At least, I get apprehensive. Do you? I ask, because I suspect that tolerance for poorly written communication is growing; something confirmed by the numerous errors you will see – especially in social media – from brands that one would hope might put a higher premium on accuracy.

When I run my occasional workshops about writing for brands, I always stress the importance of accuracy when communicating on a brand’s behalf. If they can’t write accurately or well, why should you trust anything else they do? But does that hold true anymore, in a world where an inarticulate self-confessed sexual predator with a 48-word vocabulary can become President of the USA? It might be true that bank scam emails make deliberate, obvious spelling errors to ensure they only receive replies from stupid people, but as we observe the rise of an idiocracy, is it necessary for brands to maintain high standards?

The immediacy of social media and the unreliability of spell check has created a perfect storm where (I presume) junior marketers and creatives are let loose on brands’ behalf, armed with average writing skills that emojis can only do a certain amount to rescue. If only a (very) few diehards like me become apoplectic when confronted with a glaring error, this trend may well continue.

I can’t tell you how excited I was to discover that my colleague Aisha, though only 23, shares my hatred of random capitalisation, spelling errors and the like, and, if anything, gets even more visibly annoyed than I do. There is hope, after all.

What do you think? Have you spotted an error in this article? Am I being unfair to dyslexics? Let me know.

Categories: Uncategorized

He’s floated away

September 14, 2017 Leave a comment

Being an adolescent boy is a mix of suppressed rage and desire combined with adrenaline, enthusiasm, energy and occasional bursts of pure joy. Grant Hart wrote this song and captured all that and more. RIP Grant.

Categories: blogging for Britain

Work experience stint pays dividends

August 9, 2017 Leave a comment

In these troubled times, when even having the temerity to walk past a jogger can put your life at risk, wouldn’t it be nice to stumble upon a feelgood story? Well wouldn’t it?

That’s lucky. Because it just so happens that Breakfast have a new employee. Her name is Aisha Pegley and she has now joined full-time after a couple of temporary stints (when she not only proved herself to be bright and energetic but also modelled in an ad for one of our clients). It’s a Cinderella story.

COOP002-Big-Issue-7Aisha will be deploying her many talents across all aspects of the business, but specifically by being someone else to ask when we wonder where Ed has got to.

You can contact her at apegley@breakfastagency.com if you want to say hello or try and sell her some office furniture.

Edit: All new employees at Breakfast have to endure our fearsome initiation ceremony: drawing a horse in under a minute. Here’s Aisha’s… a worthy addition to the canon.

Aisha's horse

Categories: Uncategorized